From Punta Mita we have moved a few miles north to Sayulita, a rather classic Mexican beach town renowned for its waves, its restaurants and street food, even its rather charming ambiance and visual treats.

A long wall of street paintings

A long wall of street paintings

 

An unusual shopper

An unusual shopper

 

The quiet street just behind the beach

The quiet street just behind the beach

 

A young customer awaiting his street food

A young customer awaiting his street food

 

Pizza on the street–99 pesos for a large with unlimited toppings

Pizza on the street–99 pesos for a large with unlimited toppings

From the Canadian and American perspective it is a mix of those who are here for brief vacations, those who are here as ‘snowbirds’ for the winter, and those who are here to ride the waves either in Sayulita itself or off neighboring beaches, depending on the sets coming in each day.  Unlike so much of what we have seen in Mexico, the visitors here are at least half young surfers (and some not so young), almost all attired in nothing more than bathing suits and tattoos–lots of tattoos!

We spent the entire 12 days we had in Sayulita staying at a wonderful campground right on the beach and an easy walk of three or four blocks into the heart of town (and considerably less via the beach).

Beachside at the campground

Beachside at the campground

The land was bought 48 years ago by a German immigrant from Hamburg who came to Sayulita via first Canada, then the U.S., then Mexico City, always working for Coca-Cola as a machinist on their bottling equipment.  Still married to Christina, his Mexican wife, and at 78 still with a rapid wit and intelligence, he tucked us into ‘Vanagon Corner’ and made us more than warmly welcome (am sure Bonnie had something to do with this).

Vanagon Corner

Vanagon Corner

 

Our comfy campsite

Our comfy campsite

In addition to the camping sites, they also have perhaps twenty bungalows around the edges of the property.  Everything was full for the time we were there.

The campground itself is full of a wide variety of the visitors described above, with perhaps two thirds of the spaces taken by those who have been coming south to this campground for years, often leaving their motor homes or trailers here all year.  The various campers, trailers and small motor homes line each side of the campground down to the beach, leaving a wide lawn in the middle for the volleyball net, a long tiedown strap lashed tightly between two trees and inviting surfers to try their balance on the tightrope, and the afternoon boche game at 4PM daily and usually won by Christina.

The view from our campsite down to the ocean

The view from our campsite down to the ocean

 

The Veggie Man making his usual stop in the campground

The Veggie Man making his usual stop in the campground

We also had most of a morning with two couples traveling in ruggedized Land Rovers. It was really interesting to get the prospective of people for whom roads are not the only avenue of travel and whose vehicles are outfitted to take them anywhere and extract them from any difficulty.  They encouraged us to attend a rally of ‘Overlanders’ in mid May in Mormon Valley south of Flagstaff, Arizona.  We will see.  It would certainly be an interesting group.

Sandra “Overland” Young climbing down from their sleeping quarters

Sandra “Overland” Young climbing down from their sleeping quarters